Skip to content

Language switcher

Trade and Other Underlying Causes of Forest Loss

Deforestation and forest degradation can be successfully tackled, and forest conservation and restoration enhanced, by tackling the real underlying causes of forest loss. These include reducing demand for wood and land, and supporting cultural values, Indigenous territories, and community conserved areas.

GFC aims:

  • To raise public awareness on the importance of addressing the underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation
  • To build capacity amongst all relevant actors in analyzing and addressing the underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation
  • To develop and implement, in an open and participatory manner, solution-oriented approaches towards addressing the underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation.

 

International trade in commodities like soy, beef, wood and palm oil is a major driver of forest loss, land grabbing and climate change, as documented by the Global Forest Coalition, numerous other organisations and confirmed by several scientific reports. The free trade agreements that fuel the trade in these big drivers of deforestation are a major threat to forests, ecosystems, climate change and communities. We work to halt and reverse these trade agreements, and remove agriculture and forests from the control of the World Trade Organization (WTO). We do this through active advocacy strategies and by mobilising opposition amongst our member groups, and our social movement allies. We focus on the ways in which trade and investment rules drive the expansion of international soy, beef, wood and palm oil markets, and we promote just and feasible alternatives that build towards an Economy for Life, for the health of the planet and its peoples.

For resources on this campaign please see here.


Wilmar’s No Deforestation policy tested by latest abuses by PT Asiatic Persada

(cross-posted) Jakarta, December 17, 2013 – The indigenous Suku Anak Dalam (SAD) community of Bungo, in Jambi, Indonesia has struggled for 27 years to regain control of their territory from the palm oil company PT. Asiatic Persada (PT AP). They achieved success in October when the Jambi Regional Office of the National Land Agency (BPN) and the governor of Jambi recommended that the BPN Indonesia in Jakarta review the company’s concession permit.[1] But SAD’s dream of having their 3,550 hectares returned was …

Read in full ›

A Pathetic REDD Package

On 12 November 2013, the Global Forest Coalition made the following intervention during the negotiations in Warsaw on methodologies to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation and enhance forest…

Read in full ›