Loading images...

Support GFC
Global Forest Coalition is an international coalition of NGOs and Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations defendending social justice and the rigths of forest peoples in forest policies.

Archive for the ‘REDD’ Category

GFC’s Annual Report 2013

Share

 

We are happy to bring to you our Annual Report for  the year 2013.Find out about our work and the development of our campaigns spanning from India to Colombia and beyond!

45th issue of Forest Cover, the newsletter of the Global Forest Coalition

Share
We are happy to announce the 45th issue of Forest Cover, the Global Forest Coalition newsletter on international policy processes related to forests and forest people’s rights. The editorial by our Board member Mary Lou Malig describes some of the main implications of the outcomes of the last Ministerial meeting of the World Trade Organization, followed by an overview of the latest climate negotiations and how current agreements like REDD+ fail to address key drivers of forest loss and climate change like unsustainable livestock production. Read more »

Turning Forests into Fuel for the New ‘Bio-economy?’: What Really Happens When Forests are Commodified-Voices From Around The World

Share

Extensive monoculture tree plantations in South Africa. Photo: Isis Alvarez.

Doha, Qatar- As Governments gathering for the 18th Conference of the Parties of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP18) continue discussions on the need to address the drivers of forest loss, the Global Forest Coalition [1], today launches a video repository [2] that tells a powerful story about the commodification of forests as a key driver of climate change. This can only worsen as new industrial ‘bio-economy’ strategies come into play.

The repository brings together key videos produced and directed by a wide range of groups and communities, clearly demonstrating that Indigenous Peoples and local communities in countries right across the world are encountering and challenging the same problems with the rapidly expanding commodification of forest resources. Forests, their biodiversity, and their inhabitants are under attack as never before. In addition to existing problems, such as illegal logging and the clearing of forests to grow food crops for export, a variety of new policies threaten to escalate the situation dramatically. These include the production of biofuels, and the new industrial ‘bio-economy’ approach, which aims to replace fossil fuels with biomass (including from trees), both as an energy source and to provide the raw materials for a new phase of industrialisation [3]. Read more »